Timescales

There are 5 main stages of rehabilitation;

  1. Stage 1 – Healing and starting physiotherapy
  2. Stage 2 – Visiting the Limb Centre
  3. Stage 3 – Choosing an artificial limb(s)
  4. Stage 4 – Learning to use the artificial limb
  5. Stage 5 – Life as a new amputee

Got a Question?

Our expert team is on hand to answer any questions you may have regarding our services. Please use the numbers below!

  • Stage 1 - Healing and Starting Physiotherapy
  • Stage 2 – Visiting the Limb Centre
  • Stage 3 – Choosing an artificial limb(s)
  • Stage 4 – Learning to use the artificial limb
  • Stage 5 – Life as a new amputee
  • Stage 1 - Healing and Starting Physiotherapy

    Following amputation the initial goal is for the incision and residual limb to heal. The healing process involves shrinkage of the stump as swelling will be an issue post surgery.

    After surgery the amputee will be seen by a physiotherapist who will begin massaging and stretching the residual limb, the amputee will be taught how to do this too. The physiotherapist will aid in restoring physical function and movement to the area around the amputation. Once the amputee gains more strength they will play a more active role in the physiotherapy. The exercises aim to increase circulation, strengthen muscle tone and reduce swelling.

  • Stage 2 – Visiting the Limb Centre

    When the rehab team have decided the residual limb has healed well enough the amputee will be fitted with their first, temporary, prosthesis. A temporary prosthesis will provide early mobility.

    The temporary limb allows the body to adjust to wearing prosthesis.

    Once the residual limb has settled into its final shape a definitive prosthesis, for permanent use, will be made. This will be customised to the amputee and made for long-term use.

  • Stage 3 – Choosing an artificial limb(s)

    There are many different components and prostheses available. A detailed discussion between the amputee and their prosthetist will aid in making the right choice of limb for the amputee.

    When deciding what type of limb to chose there are a number of factors that need to be considered;

    • Level of activity

    • General health

    • Level of amputation

    • Cosmetic look versus functionality

  • Stage 4 – Learning to use the artificial limb

    To assist the amputee in how to use their new limb they will be given training by a prosthetics expert, physiotherapist or occupational therapist.

    They will be able to assist with the following;

    • Learning how to fall and get up safely for leg amputees. This is important as falls are bound to occur and the amputee needs to know how to fall safely so as not to hurt themselves or damage the prosthesis

    • Gait training for leg amputees will help to develop a walk/stride that is comfortable and efficient. By doing so this reduces the stress and wear and tear place on the residual limb and the rest of the body

    • Occupational therapy for arm amputees will teach the amputee how to use their artificial arm and terminal device, together with adaptive skills, such as getting dressed.

  • Stage 5 – Life as a new amputee

    Once an amputee is regularly wearing their artificial limb and rehabilitation is coming to an end, the amputee may, gradually, return to their normal lifestyle and activities.

    The rehabilitation team may suggest aids and adaptations to their home or workplace which will assist with daily living and functionality.